Posted On: November 28, 2009 by Steven J. Malman

Electrical Shock Accidents on the Job Result in Two Worker Deaths and One Injury

A worker was killed on Friday when the semi-trailer he was driving made contact with power lines at a demolition site. Gary D. Colvin was 48. According to police, Colvin suffered electric shock as he was exiting the truck, which was dumping a load of metal at a demolition site.

Unfortunately, Colvin was not the only worker to die from electric shock last week. On Wednesday, 59-year-old James Bea was pronounced dead when he was electrocuted while removing temporary lighting. Another worker, age 24, sustained critical electrical burn injuries.

The catastrophic work accident occurred when workers came into contact with a power line.

Electrocution Accidents
Electrical shock accidents can be very dangerous for workers. Electrical burns, kidney failure, neurological problems, blood clots, muscle tissue damage, eye injuries, and instant death are some of the more serious injuries that can result.

Most workers are entitled to obtain Illinois workers’ compensation whenever they are injured at work. It doesn’t matter who or what caused the work accident. This should make it easier for everyone involved. The worker gets paid work injury benefits (or the family of a deceased worker receives death benefits) and the employer doesn’t have to contend with an Illinois personal injury complaint or wrongful death lawsuit.

Unfortunately, there are instances when an employer and/or the insurer will attempt to deny or delay a work injury or death claim.

Arlington County employee electrocuted, Washington Post, November 26, 2009

Ohio man fatally shocked at Ind. demolition site, Chicago Tribune, November 27, 2009


Related Web Resources:
Workers' Compensation, Justia

OSHA

Please contact our Chicago workers’ compensation law firm to explore your legal options. We represent all kinds of workers, including construction workers, government workers, office employees, nurses, airline employees, cab drivers, railroad workers, actors, waiters, engineers, teachers, bus drivers, truck drivers, delivery workers, heavy equipment operators, etc., and their families with Illinois workers' compensation claims against employers.

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